Life is moving a little faster in the anti-piracy effort these days, it seems.

English: Flag of pirate Edward England Polski:...

Flag of the pirate (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Barely two months have passed since streaming music service Aurous reared its ugly head, when it set alarm bells ringing at record labels. Their prompt legal warnings at the time has us bid a tongue-in-cheeck “Adios Aurous!

Well, that turned out to be more a prophecy than a pun, as Aurous and its Florida-based founder, Andrew Sampson, consented to a settlement with the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and those major labels it represents.  The announcement confirms the termination of all activities for the illegal music site, which masqueraded under the usual excuses of providing artistic exposure and consumer-friendly

The announcement confirms the termination of all activities for the illegal music site, which masqueraded under the usual excuses of providing artistic exposure and consumer-friendly access to the latest music, while really it was linked to a money-making subscription scheme for another piece of software.

RIAA Chairman and CEO Cary Sherman summed up the decision perfectly with the following statement:

“We hope this sends a strong signal that unlicensed services cannot expect to build unlawful businesses on the backs of music creators.”

It seems crazy that we have to keep saying this, but no-one should be able to build a business by offering up the work of others  without having their permission. The only reason that some get away with it for as long as they do is by operating across international borders, but even then we find that authorities will always catch up with the pirates in the end.

If you want to get into the digital content business, here’s a challenge: use new technology and channels to create a truly innovative service that provides licensed content in a way that fans can’t find it anywhere else. That would be innovation!

Services like Aurous, and all the piracy sites that have come before it, are not innovative. Stealing content isn’t innovation, it’s a crime. The more start-ups that understand this from the outset and choose to build their business in a legitimate way, the better it will be for both owner, creators, and consumers in the long run.